Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

The Loving Home Care Blog

An ongoing series of informational entries

Learning New Technology

By Vernon Shipway

3/29/22

    As we mentioned in our last blog post, one way to combat loneliness and social isolation is to stay in contact with friends and family, which can be done over the phone, email, video call, or text. The use of technology to stay connected became especially important during the Covid-19 Pandemic. For younger generations, this transition to socializing virtually may have been easier than for those who are older.  In fact, many seniors say that they feel “left behind” because of the hurdles they face when it comes to learning new tech, which include cost, privacy concerns, and lack of knowledge (AARP).

    Since the pandemic, over 44% of older adults view tech more positively than they did before, and 4 out of 5 rely on technology to stay in touch with family and friends (AARP). There are also many online services that older folk can benefit from, such as staying in contact, ordering groceries, refilling prescriptions, setting reminders, paying bills, and booking telehealth appointments. Not only is there a desire to learn, but it is becoming increasingly vital that everyone have access to the online world.

    If you are trying to help a loved one learn how to use a smartphone, computer, or tablet, here are a few tips to help:

  • Validate the difficulty of learning: the internet is expansive and overwhelming, especially for someone who has never interacted with it before. Acknowledging that it can be overwhelming to learn something new can help avoid the sense embarrassment from not knowing.
  • Pace Yourself: Since it can be a lot to learn at once, make sure to go at their pace and make space for them to ask questions or try something again.
  • Avoid using jargon: online phrases that seem like common knowledge may not be understood by everyone. Make sure to be clear with your language and use metaphors to help explain (comparing URLs to street addresses is one example).
  • Gauge their comfort level: Try to determine how comfortable they are with their devices, and do not make assumptions. Do they know how to turn the device on and off? Can they silence it? This provides a starting point for the lesson.
  • Ask them: ask them what they would like to learn during a lesson and take it one step at a time. Check in regularly and make sure that they understand or are comfortable asking questions if they are confused. (Brookdale, Public Health Degrees)

    There are also resources for seniors who may be trying to learn new tech on their own. Click Here to see a wonderful list of learning programs for seniors. Oftentimes local community centers or libraries will offer tech classes as well, so be sure to reach out and see if anything is being offered in your area.

    Loving Home Care LLC offers companionship as a part of our home care services! If someone you know is suffering from loneliness or social isolation, one of our caregivers could be there to do activities, help with hobbies, share in conversation and spend quality time with them. Contact us at (802) 489-4927 or [email protected] to find a caregiver who would be a good fit for you and your loved one.​

How to Combat Loneliness

By Vernon Shipway

3/21/22

     What is loneliness and social isolation? You may be surprised to find that there is a difference between the two! Social isolation is when someone lacks social connections. Loneliness is the feeling of being alone, even if that person experiences a lot of social contact.

     With life changes such as the loss of loved ones, chronic illness, living alone or even hearing loss, it’s easy to understand why so many older adults experience loneliness and social isolation. In fact, more than one-third of adults aged 45 and older feel lonely, and nearly one-fourth of adults aged 65 and older are considered to be socially isolated (CDC). Further research has shown that social isolation and loneliness can have not only mental, but physical effects on the body as well. This can include a weakened immune system, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, anxiety, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and even death (NIA).

     Considering all of the impacts that loneliness and social isolation can have on the body and mind, it’s vital to find help for those who may be experiencing it. Here are a few tools that the NIA recommend to aid against loneliness and social isolation:

  • Find an activity or hobby that you enjoy.
  • Take a class to learn something new.
  • Schedule time to stay in touch with family, friends, and neighbors. This can be in person, by email, social media, voice call, or text.
    • If you’re not tech-savvy, sign up for a tech class at your local public library or community center to help you learn!
  • Become pen pals with someone.
  • Adopt a pet if you are able to care for them.
  • Exercise! Exercising with a friend is a good way to socialize and stay motivated.
  • Introduce yourself to your neighbors.
  • Join a faith-based organization.
  • Check out resources and programs at your local social service agencies, community and senior centers, and public libraries.
  • Join a cause and get involved in your community.

     Loving Home Care LLC offers companionship as a part of our home care services! If someone you know is suffering from loneliness or social isolation, one of our caregivers could be there to do activities, help with hobbies, share in conversation and spend quality time with them. Contact us at (802) 489-4927 or [email protected] to find a caregiver who would be a good fit for you and your loved one.